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Benchmarking the cost of repairs and maintance

These Performance Indicators are designed to capture the total spend by the landlord and show how it breaks down into categories. We are aware that different organisations will capture and record information in different ways, but the following should enable us to compare in a useful way.

Performance indicator

Description

Repairs spending as percentage of rent roll This PI records total expenditure as a percentage of the rent debit for the year. The rationale of this is to give  a comparative view of what each landlord spends as a proportion of rental income. The overall spend then breaks down into the following categories. This will allow us to be able to chart how much each landlord spends and how it breaks down.
Reactive spend per property per week Reactive or Responsive repairs’ refers to all minor, ad hoc/unplanned repairs that are reported by tenants, or arise from damage/wear and tear to communal areas and common parts. This does not include repairs undertaken as part of a planned or cyclical maintenance programme, or those undertaken to empty properties. It is repairs which cannot be planned or included in a repair programme (i.e. day to day single jobs, grouped non-urgent repairs, minor works to rectify flood or fire damage). These are usually classified as emergency; urgent; non-urgent (routine)
They should include the cost of labour as invoiced, or in the case of direct labour, the cost of the hours allocated and parts, plus parts. In the event of any professional surveyor type of input specific to the repair, this should also be included.Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year
Cyclical maintenance spend per property per week Cyclical maintenance relates to work executed in regular cycles to maintain existing building elements and prevent breakdown of components on a pre-determined programme at regular intervals e.g. annual servicing of boilers, communal painting programmes, external painting, servicing of heating systems and gas fittings and pipes, lifts etc.
Cyclical maintenance includes periodic testing such as Gas CP12, electrical and water testing.
Cyclical maintenance should NOT include works which fall into the category of ‘Major Works’
Major works spend per property per week Major works relates to improvement or renewal work to existing stock (including any such repairs to void properties), communal or environmental improvements, excluding new build and wholesale refurbishment or regeneration.
Major works includes planned work to replace components such as window frames, roof coverings, bathrooms and kitchens.
Taken from management accounts costs should include the cost of works as invoiced, or in the case of direct labour, the cost of the hours allocated, plus parts. Professional Fees should be excluded and recorded separately.
Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year

Guidance from CoRe lettings and the RSR on what constitutes major works:

• Structural repairs – These are works that are essential to maintain stability and weather resistance in the main structural elements of a dwelling, i.e. floors, walls and roofs. Major works to these elements will involve replacement or substantial reconstruction of the component or element.
• Site works – This is work to the area around, and specific to, the dwellings involved and is essential to the safety, security and protection of tenants.
• Examples are the replacement or substantial reconstruction of unstable boundary walls, footpaths, etc.
• Services installations – This is work to building services, where deterioration is such that the basic amenities in a dwelling could be seriously impaired. For example: renewal of installations such as gas, electricity and water supplies; heating and ventilation; and lifts.
• Asbestos works
• Consequential and other works – These are works required as a consequence of major repairs such as reinstatement or making good finishes and fittings.
• Any works that significantly improve the dwellings should be classified as major repairs.

Overheads spend per property per week This PI is intended to capture all the other costs associated with the repairs & maintenance department or team, including salary costs of staff involved in delivering the maintenance service (inspecting, ordering, checking invoices, post repair inspections, and the allocated costs of people from other teams (e.g. Finance), NI, pensions, training, allocated office overheads, travel, temporary staff, recruitment, stationery, IT costs, phones, compensation and any associated legal costs.Overheads are recorded separately in order that landlords can compare spending on a like-for-like basis.The figures should be taken from management accounts.Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year
Fees spend per property per week This PI should include all professional fees for specific cyclical or major contracts, general advice on day to day repairs and general advice or professional input. The purpose of separating fees out in this way is to enable landlords to compare repairs and maintenance spending more clearly.Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year
Void works spend per property per week Void works includes all work to re-service voids, including cleaning, fumigation, security and minor repairs. Include the cost of tests and checks (such as electrical tests) if they are carried out as part of void.
EXCLUDE expenditure incurred through incentives schemes, and excluding the cost of major works undertaken to void properties.
From management accounts. Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year
Other spend per property per week This is for any other repairs and maintenance spending that does not fit under ‘reactive’, ‘cyclical’, ‘major’, ‘overheads’, ‘fees’ or ‘void repairs’.
Take the total amount for the year and divide by the average number of properties. (Average number of properties =
(A + B) / 2
Where
A = no. properties at the beginning of the year
B = no. properties at the end of the year

 

About Mark Anderson

Acuity Director
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